Afternoon Snack

This week we could like to extend our gratitude to books, ducks, and lesbians who love Carly Rae Jepsen.


This loving profile of the Go-go’s and their legacy is a super satisying read.


Speaking of Very Important Women, Carly Rae Jepsen is a benevolent mistress who truly knows the desires of her people.

https://twitter.com/JMHarenchar/status/1025887928784965634


Feast your eyes on pictures of some of the most beautiful libraries in the world, according to The Guardian.


Why does late summer continue to be the perfect time for scam stories? We may never know. What we do know is that the McDonald’s Monopoly game was rigged in the 90s by an ex-cop in Florida. (Semi-nsfw, proceed accordingly.) Has 2018 been a peak scam year or are we just too online?


Here’s our other favorite McDonald’s crime story, a little throwback to the methodical genius known as Roofman. The Daily Beast seems to have the fast food crimes beat very well covered, and we are grateful.


Now that Moviepass is dying, how can we keep going to the movies cheap and accessible? Consider nationalizing it.


POME fave David Walker, with artist Damon Smyth, has a new book out called The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of a Slave’s Journey from Bondage to Freedom, which you can preorder here. We can’t wait to read it!!


Shout-out to the DC Metro workers union, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 689, for preventing white supremacists from getting special reserved trains to their rallies.


This io9 interview with writer Nalo Hopkinson and artist Domonike Stanton successfully made us incredibly excited for their Sandman-universe book, House of Whispers.


If you make queer zines, get ’em archived for posterity!

https://twitter.com/ArtActivistNia/status/1023949229461565440?s=19


We leave you with some Millenial Feelings.

Pomegranate Magazine

Pomegranate Magazine

POMEmag is the internet’s premier pastel, macabre feminist dork publication. Or at least, a very pastel, macabre feminist dork publication that is leaning into that identity pretty hard.
Xenomorph from the 1979 film Alien
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Finding My Monsters

My fascination began with the 1979 film Alien. I was six when my parents let me watch it with them one night. The idea of an alien monster, called the Xenomorph in the movie, lurking in the vents of a spaceship was terrifying and invigorating. I wanted to know the Xenomorph’s motives. Why was the crew scared of it? Rewatching the movie as a pre-teen filled in the blanks. The crew feared the unknown, and this alien monster, for me, represented the misunderstood. I associated this monster with how I saw my body: strange, grotesque, and unnatural. It took me until my thirties to confront and reclaim my monsters.

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Afternoon Snack

If you’re still sleepy from the long weekend, we hope this sampling of links will perk you up, with no side effects! Our favorite discovery

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Roadtrip Snacks!

It’s a big national holiday in the US this week, and whether you’re driving across the state, across the street, or simply taking a mental vacation, we’ve got a little treat for you.

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POMEgranate Magazine